The Find Dining Podcast


Seth Resler

Host Seth Resler

For foodies who travel

 
Each episode, Taste Trekkers founder Seth Resler talks to a chef or culinary expert from a different region about their local dining scene.
 
 
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Recent Episodes

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Dwight Furrow

Dwight Furrow, the author of American Foodie: Taste, Art, and the Cultural Revolution, talks about the philosophy of food. We discuss everything the impact of everything from automobile to Alice Waters to the Slow Food movement have shaped the way Americans think about food.
 
 
 
 
American Foodie










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Inbal Baum

Inbal Baum

Inbal Baum, the Founder of Delicious Israel, joins us to talk about where foodies should eat when they travel to her country.

  • Shakshouka is a popular dish in Israel
  • Israeli Breakfast is a distinct and important meal
  • The modern cherry tomato has roots in Israel
  • Tel Aviv and Jerusalem top the list of cities you should visit
  • Beach season runs from April to October
  • Rosh Hashana is a great time to visit Israel
  • When you visit Tel Aviv, go to the Carmel Market, the Levinsky Market
  • Try the date syrup, Silan

 

 

Food for Thought

  • delicious israel Q: After pita bread, what is the most common food used to “wipe” humus?
  • A: Raw onion.

 
 

Out of the Frying Pan

  • Favorite Spot for Outdoor Dining: Milgo & Milbar
  • Favorite Place to Buy Spices: Cafe Arma in Levinsky Market
  • Herbs to Try: Za’atar and Hawaij (in Yemenite Coffee)
  • Favorite Winery: Sphera
  • Favorite Place for Dessert: The Malabia
  • Favorite Food Experience for Kids: Max Brenner
  • Chef to Watch: Eyal Shani
  • Dish to Try at Different Places: Shakshouka and sabich









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Bennett Jacobstein

Bennett Jacobstein

Bennet Jacobstein, author of The Joy of Ballpark Food: From Hot Dogs to Haute Cuisine, talks to us about what foodies can find at different baseball stadiums around the country.

  • Hot dogs and sausages are not the same thing.
  • The quality of ballpark food was elevated in the 90s as new stadiums were built and food television shows took off.
  • Stadiums have highlighted regional foods.
  • Gordon Biersch‘s founder Dan Gordon introduced garlic fries at Candlestick Park in 1994.
  • The song “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” was written in 1908.
  • The Yankees replaced Cracker Jacks at one point, but brought it back after a public outcry.
  • San Francisco Giant Gordon Biersch Garlic Fries

    San Francisco Giant Gordon Biersch Garlic Fries

    Veggie Happy spearheaded the movement to get veggie dogs sold at ballpark stadiums.

  • Andrew Zimmern has a stand in the Minnesota ballpark.
  • Rocky Mountain Oysters are bull testicles.
  • “The Big Six” are the food companies that service the major ballparks.
  • As you go from ballpark to ballpark, try the hot dogs at each to see how they’re done differently.
  • Proceeds from Bennett’s book go to Second Harvest Food Bank.

 

Food for Thought

  • The Joy of Ballpark Food Q: In what year were Cracker Jacks first served at a baseball game?
  • A: 1896 in Atlantic City.

 

Out of the Frying Pan

Here’s what Bennet recommends you try at each ballpark:

  • Yankees Stadium in New York City: Chicken and Waffles.
  • Fenway Park in Boston: Lobster Roll and a cuban sandwich.
  • Wrigley Field in Chicago: Chicago-style hot dog with Vienna beef.
  • Turner Field in Atlanta: Boiled peanuts.
  • Marlins Park in Miami: Cuban dishes.
  • Safeco Field in Seattle: The Ivar’s hot dog (with fish) and cream cheese hot dog.
  • Nationals Park in Washington D.C.: A cauliflower hot dog and presidential cupcakes.
  • Chicago White Sox Chicago-Style Hot Dog

    Chicago White Sox Chicago-Style Hot Dog

    Busch Stadium in St. Louis: The BBQ.

  • Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles: Tommy Lasorda Spumoni ice cream.
  • AT&T Park in San Francisco: Crab salad, lamb sausages, and Gordon Biersch garlic fries.










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Marie Ducote

Marie Ducote

Marie Ducote of Cajun Food Tours in Lafayette, Louisiana, tells us about the Cajun food scene. We talk about king cakes, gumbo, and the differences between Cajun and Creole food.

  • Lafayette has the second largest Mardi Gras celebration in the United States
  • Lafayette is Cajun country; New Orleans is Creole
  • Crawfish runs from January until June
  • Johnson’s Boucaniere is a fantastic smokehouse if you enjoy sausage

 

Food for Thought

 

Out of the Frying Pan

 











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Hedi Burnette

Heidi Burnette

In this episode of the Find Dining podcast, Heidi Burnette of Forktown Food Tours in Portland, Oregon, tells us about her food scene. We talk about food carts, merroir, and the fact that real Oregonians don’t use umbrellas.

 

Food for Thought

  • Q: What berry was developed in Oregon in the 1950s and was named after an Oregon county?
  • A: The Marionberry.

 

Out of the Frying Pan

  • Favorite Place to Brunch: Screen Door (Get the fried chicken and waffles) or Country Cat
  • Favorite Place for Cocktails: Rum Club
  • Favorite Food Cart Success Story: Rick Gencarelli’s Lardo
  • Favorite Restaurant Decor: Woodsman Tavern
  • Favorite Portlandia Scene:









Play

 
Jeff Head Shot - Small

Jeff Greif

In this episode of the Find Dining podcast, Jeff Greif, the Founder and Editor in Chief of the travel website Travel Squire. We talk about the site’s list of the 28 Hot Destinations of 2015. He helps us pick out the best choices for foodies.

  • See Travel Squire’s list of the Top 28 Destinations of 2015: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, & Part 4
  • Explore the food scene in Tunisia
  • Go wine tasting in Alsace, where you’ll find Germanic and French food traditions
  • And explore Baiersbronn, Germany (The Black Forest): Harald Wohlfahrt in the Schwarzwaldstube Restaurant in Tonbach, Claus-Peter Lumpp in the Bareiss Restaurant in Mitteltal, and Jörg Sackmann in the Schlossberg Restaurant in Schwarzenberg
  • Try the street food at the night markets in Taiwan, including Snake Alley (the Huaxi Street Night Market)
  • Great Britain gets a bad rap; you should try the food in London, including the new Bibliotecha
  • Tour the Sapporo Brewery in Japan
  • Louisville, Kentucky aims to be the Napa Valley of bourbon
  • 90% of the U.S. disco balls are manufactured in Louisville

 

 

Food for Thought

Q: What is the most remote place on earth that you can get fish cakes?

A: St. Helena Island.
 
 

Out of the Frying Pan

 










Play

 
Jodi Ettenberg

Jodi Ettenberg

Seven years ago, Jodi Ettenberg quit her job to travel the world, eat delicious food, and launch the Legal Nomads blog. In this episode of the Find Dining podcast, she tells us her story.

 

Food for Thought

  • Q: Where did ketchup originate?
  • A: China.

 

Out of the Frying Pan

  • Most Romantic Place: El Nido, Palawan in the Phillippines
  • Favorite Market: Rotating Markets on Inle Lake in Myanmar
  • Favorite Wineries: On the island of Waiheke in New Zealand
  • Favorite Dessert: Crunchy grapes (?!?) and Cha-An (black sesame dessert)
  • Favorite Holiday Celebration: Anything local
  • Favorite Cheese: Sheep’s Milk Cheddar from Portland, Oregon and Stilton cheese from the UK
  • Inspirational Advice: Food is the best way to discover new places










 

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